Nutritional Tips for Pregnancy

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Iron requirements increase in pregnancy to support your growing blood volume, the baby and placenta. Iron rich foods are meat, fish and poultry, tahini, black strap molasses and raisins. Other non-animal sources of iron are best absorbed along with some vitamin C such as piece of fruit or vegetable, fortified soy products and legumes.
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Folic Acid is important to prevent neural tube defects such as spina bifida. It is especially important before pregnancy and through the first trimester. A supplement containing 0.4mg of folic acid should be taken daily. As well as taking a supplement, a diet high in folate can also help keep you and your baby healthy: dark green veggies such as green leafy vegetables spinach, kale, peas, and oranges.
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Calcium absorption.  Increases in pregnancy, so your needs increase. Most women do not consume enough calcium, and it is important for building your baby’s bones and teeth as well as maintaining yours. Eat or drink 3-4 servings of calcium rich products during your pregnancy. If you don’t drink milk, soy, almond, rice or oat milk and other foods such as spinach, beans and figs are also good sources.

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A healthy breakfast –  should include protein, and carbohydrates, such as granola with yogurt.

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Keep your body hydrated. Starting with hot water and lemon in the morning will get your metabolism started and helps detoxify your liver.

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Be prepared.  Take one day every week to plan your meals, always have food on hand to avoid eating junk food when nothing else is available

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Don’t let your stomach go empty.  Eat small frequent nutritionally dense foods. Small meals are easy to digest and don’t promote heart burn

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Food allergies in children tend to develop within the first year of life and milk and egg are common allergies from birth to age two.

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DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) is now thought to constitute the ‘building blocks’ of the brain, forming about 8% of the brain by weight – this is why it is important for pregnant mothers to ensure an adequate supply throughout pregnancy.

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Great sources of Omega 3 are wild salmon (fresh or canned) sardines, anchovies, mackerel, walnuts, olive oil, flax oil and algae

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Integrate whole grains into your diet such as amaranth, brown rice, buckwheat, kamut, quinoa, millet and spelt. These grains have fiber, B vitamins and protein.

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Pregnancy and postpartum are important times in your life to focus on your health.  The knowledge and guidance of a holistic nutritionist will go a long way to keeping you, your baby and your family healthy and happy.

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